'340,000 Rohingya children are starving in Cox’s Bazar refugee camps' | daily-sun.com

'340,000 Rohingya children are starving in Cox’s Bazar refugee camps'

Sun Online Desk     21st October, 2017 09:36:37 printer

'340,000 Rohingya children are starving in Cox’s Bazar refugee camps'

More than 340,000 Rohingya children fleeing violence in Myanmar are seeing “hell on Earth” in overcrowded, muddy and disease-infested refugee camps in neighbouring Bangladesh, according to UNICEF.

 

Many of the children are alone, starving, in need of medical attention and at risk of being captured and thrown into human trafficking, the aid organization said.

 

Humanitarian organizations, like UNICEF and Amnesty International, are warning the international community if enough aid is not provided in the next six months, many of the most vulnerable — women, children and the elderly — will die.

 

Since late August, more than half a million Rohingya refugees have fled into Bangladesh following an outbreak of violence in Rakhine state in Myanmar causing a humanitarian crisis in the region with continued challenges for aid agencies.

 

But the international community, including Canada, is not doing enough to help in what the United Nations is calling, the “most urgent refugee emergency in the world,” aid groups say.

 

“It’s an unprecedented humanitarian crisis,” Omar Waraich with Amnesty International said. “Bangladesh is a poor country and are having to deal with a crisis beyond their means.

It’s coping so far, but the situation is only going to get worse.”

 

Bangladesh cannot be left to deal with the situation by themselves, he said. “Why hasn’t the international community done anything?”

 

Waraich is working on the ground in Bangladesh in a massive refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, and called it a “desperate situation.”

 

Rohingya children are making the dangerous trek from Myanmar to Bangladesh. Many of their parents and siblings have been killed in Myanmar and arrive at the camps alone without anyone to care for them.

 

They are malnourished, dehydrated, and are at risk of contracting diseases such as cholera and malaria.

 

 Source: Global News


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